Dr. Sukumar Ethirajan, MD: Out Of Pocket Expenses
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Out Of Pocket Expenses

June 28, 2016

Bloomberg News (6/27, Ramkumar, 2.07M) reports that “during the study period, deductibles grew 86 percent and coinsurance costs rose 33 percent.” Although “co-payment costs fell…so did the number of insurance plans that charged them.” The data indicated “out-of-pocket costs exceeded the annual growth of insurance premiums…which increased 5.1 percent” annually.

Posted in News by Dr. ET
June 21, 2016

John C. Goodman , CONTRIBUTOR I offer market-based healthcare solutions. Have you ever wondered why you doctor doesn’t talk to you by phone? Lawyers, accountants, engineers and just about every other professional you can think of discovered that phones are a handy way of communicating with clients almost a century ago. More recently, they turned to email. Why haven’t doctors made these discoveries? It gets worse. Have you ever wondered why the doctors who prescribe medications have no idea what they cost or where you can get the best price in the area where you live? All these questions have the same answer: doctors don’t get paid to do these things. Doctors are the only professionals in our society who are not free to re-package and re-price the services they offer to the market – when technology changes or demand changes or the state of knowledge of the profession changes. It starts with Medicare, which has a list of about 7,500 tasks that it pays physicians to perform. One problem with paying any professional according to a list of tasks is that there will always be things you don’t think of and leave off the list. For all practical purposes, Medicare left the telephone off the list. It also over looked emailing. Ditto for advising patients on being wise purchasers of drugs. The way Medicare pays is also the way Blue Cross pays. And Employers. And other insurers. T

Posted in News by Dr. ET
June 5, 2016

  NYT Liquid biopsies Session: Tumor Biology Type: Oral Abstract Session Time: Tuesday June 7, 8:00 AM to 11:00 AM Location: S100a Add this presentation to my iPlanner Schedule. Somatic genomic landscape of over 15,000 patients with advanced-stage cancer from clinical next-generation sequencing analysis of circulating tumor DNA. Sub-category: Molecular Diagnostics and Imaging Category: Tumor Biology Meeting: 2016 ASCO Annual Meeting Abstract No: LBA11501 Citation: J Clin Oncol 34, 2016 (suppl; abstr LBA11501)

Posted in News by Dr. ET
June 5, 2016

  ASCO Book Club to Discuss Bestseller When Breath Becomes Air

Posted in News, Patient Stories by Dr. ET
May 23, 2016

House calls

Posted in News by Dr. ET
May 11, 2016

LIFE HEALTH HEALTH JOURNAL A Better Prostate-Cancer Test? Several new prostate-cancer tests aim to reduce needless biopsies and unnecessary treatments by sorting out harmless from aggressive tumors Cell division of a prostate-cancer cell, captured in a colored scanning electron micrograph (SEM) image. Several new tests performed on blood, urine or tissue samples aim to tell patients not simply if they have prostate cancer, but also whether it is aggressive enough to warrant treating—or whether it can be safety monitored instead. ENLARGE Cell division of a prostate-cancer cell, captured in a colored scanning electron micrograph (SEM) image. Several new tests performed on blood, urine or tissue samples aim to tell patients not simply if they have prostate cancer, but also whether it is aggressive enough to warrant treating—or whether it can be safety monitored instead. PHOTO: SPL/ SCIENCE SOURCE By MELINDA BECK Updated May 9, 2016 8:29 p.m. ET 32 COMMENTS When Al Piazza learned he had prostate cancer, his first thought was, “Let’s get this out and be done with it,” he says. But his urologist, Jeremy Lieb, said the side effects of treatment could be more harmful than the cancer itself. Dr. Lieb ran a genetic test on the patient’s biopsy sample, which calculated that Mr. Piazza, then 70 years old, had only a 3% chance of dying from prostate cancer over the next 10 years

Posted in News by Dr. ET